ALA 2018 in San Francisco, CA

Join us at the 2018 American Literature Association Conference in San Francisco, California, May 24-27, for two panels sponsored by the Margaret Fuller Society.

“Margaret Fuller: In the Classroom and Beyond” on Friday, May 25th, 2:10-3:30 PM

Chair:  Larry Reynolds, Texas A & M University

1.     “Using Fuller to Teach Fuller: Creating Agency and Security,” Holly Dykstra, Laredo Community College

2.     “Teaching Margaret Fuller, Fanny Fern, and the Nineteenth-Century Press in the Wake of #MeToo,” Callie Gallo, Fordham University

3.     “Elemental Bodies: Mapping the Materialist Cartographies of Margaret Fuller’s ‘Leila’ and Kate Chopin’s The Awakening in a Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Classroom,” Lesli Vollrath, University of Houston

4.     “Praxis of Duality: The Sisterhood of Fuller’s ‘Leila’ and Du Bois’s ‘Atlanta’,” Nanette Rasband Hilton, University of Nevada–Las Vegas. 

[The Margaret Fuller Society Business Meeting will be conducted on Saturday, May 26, at 2:10-3:30 PM.]

“Margaret Fuller:  Out of New England” on Saturday, May 26, at 3:40-5:00 PM

Chair:  Noelle Baker, Independent Scholar

1.     “Of Good and Noble Aspect: Margaret Fuller, Catholicism and Pius IX (1847-1850),” Simone Maria Puleo, University of Connecticut, Storrs

2.     “Romantic Revolutions: Cosmopolitan Radicalism in Margaret Fuller’s Dispatches from Europe,” Clemens Spahr, Mainz University, Germany

3.     “‘The Morning Star of Margaret Fuller’: The Woman’s Club Movement and the Legacy of Fuller’s Conversations,” Katie Kornacki, Caldwell University

4.    “Who’s Afraid of Margaret Fuller?: Literary and Biographical Connections Between Virginia Woolf and Margaret Fuller,” Michael Schrimper, Independent Scholar

You may also be interested in this panels with presentations on Fuller:

“‘A Choir of Resistance’: ‘Unruly’ Voices and ‘Nasty’ Women in American Literature” on Friday, May 25, at 5:10-6:30 PM

Chair: Elif Armbruster

1. “A Choir of Resistance: Margaret Fuller’s Network of Nasty Women in Woman in the Nineteenth Century,” Lesli Vollrath, University of Houston

2. “Nasty Women in the Press: Margaret Fuller, Fanny Fern, and the Pitfalls of Professionalization,” Callie Gallo, Fordham University

3. “‘A Peculiar Case’ of Women’s Writing in Elizabeth Stoddard’s The Morgesons,” Ki Yoon Jang, Sogang University (Seoul)

4. “The Unruly, Unmarried Black Woman Mimi Daquin of Walter White’s Flight,” Julie Anne Naviaux, University of Alabama in Huntsville

5. “Wandering Women and Queer Resistance in Djuna Barnes’ Nightwood,” Victoria Chandler, University of South Carolina

6. “Teaching the ‘Nasty Woman’: Facing Resistance in the Classroom,” Elif Armbruster, Suffolk University

The full program draft is available here.

Transcendentalist Intersections Conference Registration

Transcendentalist Intersections: Literature, Philosophy, Religion” will be held at the University of Heidelberg, Germany on July 26 – 29, 2018. This conference is sponsored by the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society, the Margaret Fuller Society, and the Anglistisches Seminar and Center for American Studies at the University of Heidelberg.

The conference registration fee is $100 USD (80 euros), which includes the reception. To pay your registration fee using PayPal, please click on the button below.

Reception Only ($20)

Student and Non-Academic Entry ($50)

ALA 2018 Call for Papers

The Margaret Fuller Society invites proposals for two panels at the American Literature Association 29th Annual Conference in San Francisco, CA, May 24-27, 2018.

Margaret Fuller: In the Classroom and Beyond

We invite submissions that address teaching Fuller in any academic context or in venues outside of the traditional classroom.

Margaret Fuller: Out of New England

We invite submissions that address such topics as:

–Fuller and the West

–Fuller and the East

–Fuller and regionalism

–Fuller and New York/Paris/Rome

–Fuller and transnationalism or cosmopolitanism

–Fuller and translation

We especially welcome proposals that approach Fuller along with other writers.

Please send a one-page proposal to Charlene Avallone (avallone000@gmail.com) by 15 January 2018.

Featured photo is of the Hyatt Regency in San Francisco, CA via Google Maps.

Fullerians at SSAWW in Bordeaux

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The Place de la Bourse at night

Conference director Stéphanie Durrans and her coworkers welcomed us this July to the Université Bordeaux Montaigne for the first international conference organized by the Society for the Study of American Women Writers, a gathering characterized by the hospitality and intellectual stimulation traditionally associated with the host nation.  Not surprisingly, Margaret Fuller was much in evidence–for among American writers, Fuller stands out as paradigmatic of the conference theme: Border Crossings.

Notorious in her own time for transgressing and confounding boundaries in her life and work, Fuller remains recognized for transcending confines.  She evaded restrictions on education and library access, preparing herself for an exceptional career that amalgamated roles as educator, public intellectual, translator, journalist, frontier and transnational travel writer, and theorist of (trans)gender.  Born into New England elite, she represented causes of immigrants and the poor and championed claims of human rights against state and social constraints.  A female pioneer in transnational cultural and political journalism, Fuller explored the possibilities of literary and political connections in her European travels.  Her writings, now issued in several nations and languages, often blur conventional boundaries between oral/literary discourse, male/female spheres, or popular/high genres of literature and philosophy.

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Panelists on the roundtable sponsored by the Fuller Society highlighted this liminal figure, examining:  Fuller’s literal and political translations of European writers (Kathleen Lawrence); her redefinition in her pedagogy and literary canon of the boundaries between women’s conversational culture/Socratic dialogue and imitative/original learning and writing (Christa Vogelius); her participation in multilingual epistolary networks that cross national, ideological, private/public, and genre boundaries (Sonia Di Loreto); her transformation of nationalist travelogue through her transatlantic reading and travel, deviation from normative masculine perspectives, and translation (Brigitte Bailey); and transnational reception history of her life and work (Marina Kizima).

On another panel, speakers analyzed Fuller’s self-conscious rhetorical strategies of revisioning as she confronted changing national borderlines and internal divisions, including over slavery (Mollie Barnes), and directed attention from Fuller’s connection to socialism to consideration of her thinking about property and its relation to revolution (Abigail Fagan). Together, they conveyed a nuanced sense of Fuller’s journalistic negotiations with radical political positions.

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The panel, 19th-Century Women Crossing Borders between Literature, Science, Politics and Welfare Issues: Margaret Jay Jessee, Abigail Fagan, and Mollie Barnes

This post was written by Margaret Fuller Society First Vice President and contributing author Charlene Avallone. 

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Many thanks to Brigitte Bailey (left, next to Sonia Di Loreto) for providing photos from the event!

Welcome to our new website!

We are happy to launch our new website, where you can find resources such as teaching materials and recent paper abstracts on Margaret Fuller’s life and works, see what’s happening in the news, and view upcoming events and calls for papers.

Take some time to read about a new digital humanities archive of Fuller’s travels in Italy and correspondence for the Tribune. Thanks to the hard work of Sonia Di Loreto and her team, this archive is now available and will be a useful teaching tool.

Browse posts about Fuller in recent news, and what Fuller society members have been doing to mark the historic location where Fuller wrote Woman in the Nineteenth Century.

Get to know your Margaret Fuller Society leadership, the valuable community work being done at the Margaret Fuller Neighborhood House, and become a member yourself or donate to the society.